Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit
only search www.healthunit.org

Topics

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Adults / Seniors

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Alcohol / Drugs

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Babies / Children

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Beauty & Body Art

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Clinics

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Dental Services / Oral Health

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Developmental Assets /
Value Every Kid

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Drinking Water

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Emergencies / Disasters

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Environmental Health

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Food Safety

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Hand Washing

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Harm Reduction

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Health Care Professionals

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Health Equity

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Immunization / Vaccines

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Infectious Diseases /
Prevention / Control

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Injury Prevention

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Lyme Disease

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Nutrition

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Physical Activity

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Preconception / Pregnancy

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Rabies

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Recreational Water

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Reports & Newsletters

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

School

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Sewage / Land Control

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Sexual Health

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Smoking / Tobacco

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Sun Safety

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Weather

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Workplace Health

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit
Home About Us Board of Health Careers Contact Us Media Search
Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit
Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Nutrition - Iron

Iron

Iron

Iron is one of the 13 nutrients listed on food labels in Canada. It is found on the Nutrition Facts table on the product packaging.

Iron does many things in the body, including helping your blood cells transport oxygen to the rest of your body. People who don't get enough iron in the foods that they eat are at risk for iron deficiency. Growing teens, children, menstruating and pregnant women need the most iron. Iron deficiency can cause you to feel tired, have a lack of energy, poor appetite and become pale.

 

Life Stage

Age

Iron Needs

Safe Upper Level

Infants

0-6 months

0.27 mg

40 mg

7-12 months

11 mg

40 mg

Children

1-3 years

7 mg

40 mg

4-8 years

10 mg

40 mg

9-13 years

8 mg

40 mg

Adult Females

14-18 years

15 mg

45 mg

19-50 years

18 mg

45 mg

51-70+ years

8 mg

45 mg

Pregnancy

19-50 years

27 mg

45 mg

Lactation

19-50 years

9 mg

45 mg

Adult Males

14-18 years

11 mg

45 mg

19-70+ years

8 mg

45 mg

Source: Dietary Reference Intakes, 2004.

 

There are 2 types of iron

Heme Iron

Non-heme Iron

Heme iron is found in animal sources of iron, such as meat, fish, seafood and poultry. This type is absorbed more easily than non-heme iron.

Non-heme iron is found in dairy, eggs and plant-based sources of iron, such as beans, grains, enriched tofu, and some vegetables and fruit. Many foods, such as bread, cereals and breakfast bars are good source of iron because they are have added iron (called iron fortification). Iron supplements are also non-heme iron. Non-heme iron is less easily absorbed.

Vegetarians are at risk for iron deficiency, because heme iron, which is better absorbed, is found only in animal products. There are many vegetarian foods that are a good source of non-heme iron. If you plan your diet carefully you can usually get enough iron from food. If you follow a vegetarian diet, it's a good idea to talk to your health care provider about your iron intake and iron deficiency.

Some foods can affect how much iron you absorb from the foods you eat.

Vitamin C helps to increase the amount of iron you can absorb. To increase absorption of iron, choose vitamin C containing foods when you are eating foods that contain iron. Kiwi, strawberries, citrus fruits, and sweet peppers are high in vitamin C.

Coffee, tea, chocolate, and raw spinach contain compounds called phytates and/or oxylates that decrease the absorption of iron. If you are trying to increase iron in your diet, try to avoid these foods when you are eating foods that are high in iron.

Although iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency, not all of us need to worry about getting enough iron. Some people can get iron overload by consuming or absorbing more iron than they need. Taking too much iron can be very dangerous.

Many people get just the right amount of iron from the food they eat, but certain people may need to take iron supplements:




Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit
Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit Quick Links


YouTube

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit
Disclaimer | Privacy Statement | Accessibility | Feedback
Copyright © 2017
In Case of Public Health Emergency Please Call 613-345-5685
Any questions or concerns with the website, please contact Webmaster
Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit
Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit