Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit
only search www.healthunit.org

Topics

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Adults / Seniors

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Alcohol / Drugs

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Babies / Children

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Beauty & Body Art

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Clinics

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Dental Services / Oral Health

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Developmental Assets /
Value Every Kid

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Drinking Water

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Emergencies / Disasters

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Environmental Health

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Food Safety

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Hand Washing

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Harm Reduction

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Health Care Professionals

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Health Equity

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Immunization / Vaccines

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Infectious Diseases /
Prevention / Control

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Injury Prevention

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Lyme Disease

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Nutrition

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Physical Activity

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Preconception / Pregnancy

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Rabies

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Recreational Water

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Reports & Newsletters

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

School

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Sewage / Land Control

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Sexual Health

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Smoking / Tobacco

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Sun Safety

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Weather

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Workplace Health

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit
Home About Us Board of Health Careers Contact Us Media Search
Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit
Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Nutrition - Milk Myths

You may be questioning the safety of drinking cow’s milk. What are some of these recent claims against milk and what are the facts?


Myth – Milk causes acne

Fact – The idea that foods cause acne is false. Certain foods such as milk, chocolate, french fries, cola, peanuts and iodine-containing foods such as shellfish, have all been accused of causing acne. Scientific research has not found a link between diet and acne. A number of factors working together, such as genetics, skin type, hormones and pollution are believed to be the cause.


Myth – Milk causes obesity

Fact – Drinking milk does not lead to obesity. No single food causes weight gain. Food can lead to weight gain when eaten in excess of your energy needs. If you consume more energy (calories) than you burn, weight gain will result. Milk products come in a range of fat contents (% MF) to suit any lifestyle. All milk has the same amount of calcium regardless of its fat content.


Myth – Milk contains hormones that are harmful to humans

Fact – Canada does not allow the use of growth hormones to increase milk production in cows. Therefore, no added growth hormones are found in any Canadian milk or milk products. There are also no antibiotic residues in any Canadian milk or milk products. Natural hormones from the cow do pass into the milk - however they have no effect on humans when consumed and are digested like any other protein. Bovine Growth Hormone (BGH), also known as recombinant Bovine Somatotropin (rBST), is currently used in the United States to increase milk production in cows. rBST is not present in milk that is produced in Canada.


Myth – Milk causes heart disease

Fact – No one food causes heart disease. Eating any foods that are rich in saturated fat can increase risk of heart disease. Foods high in saturated fat include meats, baked products, butter, lard, coconut, palm oils, and high fat dairy products. The best way to reduce your risk of heart disease is to eat a balanced diet that is low in fat, include regular physical activity, and reduce the stress in your life.


Myth– Milk causes allergies


Fact – No one food causes an allergy. Milk allergy is a reaction of the immune system to the protein in milk. True milk allergies are not very common - only about 1% to 3% of children have a cow’s milk allergy and they usually outgrow this by age three. In adults the rate is even lower. The major factor that triggers a food allergy is family history of food allergies. Drinking milk will not cause a milk allergy or allergies of any other kind.


Myth – Milk robs the body of calcium

Fact – A common myth is that high protein foods cause the body to lose calcium. In fact, most food sources of protein such as milk and milk products, meat, fish and beans contain phosphorus, which helps prevent the loss of calcium in urine. Because of the phosphorus and other compounds in milk and milk products, calcium is highly absorbed, with very little negative influence from protein. The overall result is that the body retains more calcium from milk and milk products with minimal calcium loss in the urine.


Myth - Dietitians promote milk because they are all paid by the dairy industry.

Fact - This is simply not true. Registered Dietitians do not receive kickbacks or bonus money from dairy farmers of the dairy industry to promote milk. Registered Dietitians make recommendations based on sound scientific evidence rather than relying on opinions or a "good guess". The science clearly shows that milk products supply many valuable nutrients and can be part of a healthy way of eating.


Myth – Milk is important for kids, but adults do not need to drink it.

Fact – Milk and milk products are important at all ages in order to get the calcium we need. Different amounts are required at different ages. One cup of 1% milk contains 317 mg calcium. Children need to drink about 3 cups of milk per day, and teenagers and adults need to drink 4 cups of milk per day to get enough calcium. That means that for a family of four (2 adults, 2 children), one 4 litre bag of milk will last about one and a half days.

If you choose not to drink milk, you still need to consume the same amount of calcium.
There are other foods and beverages you can drink to get the calcium you need. Contact a Registered Dietitian to help you choose the healthiest foods to supply calcium.




Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit
Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit Quick Links


YouTube

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit
Disclaimer | Privacy Statement | Accessibility | Feedback
Copyright © 2017
In Case of Public Health Emergency Please Call 613-345-5685
Any questions or concerns with the website, please contact Webmaster
Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit
Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit