Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit
only search www.healthunit.org

Topics

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Adults / Seniors

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Alcohol / Drugs

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Babies / Children

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Beauty & Body Art

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Clinics

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Dental Services / Oral Health

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Developmental Assets /
Value Every Kid

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Drinking Water

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Emergencies / Disasters

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Environmental Health

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Food Safety

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Hand Washing

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Harm Reduction

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Health Care Professionals

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Health Equity

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Immunization / Vaccines

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Infectious Diseases /
Prevention / Control

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Injury Prevention

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Lyme Disease

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Nutrition

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Physical Activity

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Preconception / Pregnancy

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Rabies

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Recreational Water

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Reports & Newsletters

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

School

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Sewage / Land Control

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Sexual Health

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Smoking / Tobacco

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Sun Safety

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Weather

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

Workplace Health

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit
Home About Us Board of Health Careers Contact Us Media Search
Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit
Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit

 
FAQ

 

What is Chlamydia?

Chlamydia is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Chlamydia is not the same as gonorrhea and it needs to be treated with different medications. It is caused by a bacteria which lives inside the cells of the reproductive tract. One can have the bacteria for a long time before symptoms show up. Many people never have symptoms. Even if you have no symptoms, chlamydia can be spread to others during oral, vaginal or anal sexual intercourse. Untreated chlamydia is one of the main causes of infertility (the inability to get pregnant) in women.

Chlamydia is a reportable disease and must be reported to the Health Unit.




What are the symptoms?


Men:

  • often no symptoms
  • watery discharge from penis
  • burning/itching around tip of penis
  • frequent passing of urine
  • burning pain when passing urine
  • tenderness of the testicles

Women:

  • often no symptoms
  • increased vaginal discharge
  • vaginal itching
  • burning pain when passing urine
  • pain during sexual intercourse
  • bleeding after intercourse
  • bleeding between menstrual periods
  • pain in the lower abdomen





Are there complications?


Men: Inflammation and spread of the infection to the testicles and prostate gland may cause a man to become sterile.

Women: Inflammation and spread of the infection to the fallopian tubes and ovaries may cause Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID). This can make a woman sterile or cause a tubal pregnancy. Babies born to women with untreated chlamydia often get severe eye and lung infections.




How is chlamydia diagnosed?


Chlamydia can be diagnosed by taking a swab from a woman's cervix or the tip of a man's penis. Chlamydia can be diagnosed by a urine sample testing.




How is chlamydia treated?


Chlamydia is treated with specific antibiotics. To cure chlamydia all prescribed pills must be taken. It is important that all sexual partner(s) be tested and treated, whether they have symptoms or not. It is best to avoid all genital contact, especially sexual intercourse, even with a condom, until all medication is finished.




Is follow-up important?


Yes. Clients should return to the clinic for a repeat test to make sure the chlamydia has been cured.




How can I protect myself?


Chlamydia can spread to other sex partners as soon as you become infected.  Since most people do not have early symptoms of the disease it can be unknowingly spread to others.

You can have sex again when you and your partner(s) have finished the prescribed treatment.

Tell every partner you have had sex with in the past 3 months that they may be infected and should be examined and, if needed, treated.  A public health nurse can help you with this and your name will be kept confidential.




Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit
Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit Quick Links


YouTube

Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit
Disclaimer | Privacy Statement | Accessibility | Feedback
Copyright © 2017
In Case of Public Health Emergency Please Call 613-345-5685
Any questions or concerns with the website, please contact Webmaster
Leeds, Grenville and Lanark District Health Unit
Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit Leeds, Grenville & Lanark District Health Unit